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2 edition of Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks found in the catalog.

Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks

Horace Ochanda

Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks

by Horace Ochanda

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  • 7 Currently reading

Published by typescript in [s.l.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Warwick, 1994.

Statementby Horace Ochanda.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21287739M

East Coast fever (Theileria parva infection in cattle) was eradicated from South Africa in the midHowever, another form named Corridor disease (CD), associated with T. parva carrier buffaloes exists and outbreaks have increased in endemic areas. The occurrence of a CD carrier state in cattle under field situations has not been demonstrated but remains a subject of by: 2. 1. Introduction. East Coast fever (ECF) is a fatal tick-borne disease of cattle that occurs in eastern, central and southern Africa (Norval et al., , Kivaria, ).The disease is caused by the intracellular protozoan parasite, Theileria parva, and is transmitted by the brown ear tick (Rhipicephalus appendiculatus) (Gachohi et al., , Abdela and Bekele, ).Cited by: 5.

TICK-BORNE LIVESTOCK DISEASES AND THEIR VECTORS 1. The global problem. PHOTO: CIBA-GEIGY East Coast fever is a cattle disease caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria parva. such basic factors as target species, the biology and population dynamics of these species in different areas, the role of wildlife in maintaining tick.   The population ecology of ticks is fundamental to the spatial and temporal variation in the risk of infection by tick-borne pathogens. Tick population dynamics can only be fully understood by quantifying the rates of the demographic processes, which are influenced by both abiotic (climatic) factors acting on the free-living tick stages and biotic (host) responses to the tick as a by:

Affect of different environmental factors i.e., temperature, relative humidity and precipitation on population dynamics, density and foraging activities of Microtermes obesi Holmgren and Odontotermes lokanandi Chatarjee and Thakur (Isoptera: Termitidae) were studied from March to July in Islamabad. A total of poplar wooden stakes was used for monitoring the termite activities in Cited by: 3. Introduction. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and tick borne haemoparasites including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis (cowdriosis), and theileriosis limit livestock production in endemic areas worldwide including sub-Saharan Africa (1, 2).Ticks and TBDs affect nearly 80% of the world's cattle population, with estimated annual global costs ranging from US$ billion ().


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Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks by Horace Ochanda Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ochanda, Horace () Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks Author: Ochanda, HoraceCited by: 4. Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks.

By Horace Ochanda. Abstract. A series of experiments were carried out to investigate some of the poorly understood\ud aspects of the life cycle of Theilefid parva in its rhipicephalid tick vectors. The first\ud series of experiments established that nymphae Author: Horace Ochanda.

Factors influencing infections in Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on cattle infected with Theileria parva - Volume Issue 3 - A. Young, T. Dolan, S.

P Cited by: Theileria parva infections for both categories of ticks survived in the nymphal ticks for 50 or 26 weeks post salivary gland infection under quasi-natural or laboratory conditions respectively. Abstract. In this review we consider the dynamics of transmission of Theileria species by ixodid ria parasites are of great economic importance since they cause theilerioses in domestic animals in many parts of the world (23, 94).

These disease of cattle have been referred to as East Coast fever, Corridor disease, and January disease in the case of T.

parva infection and Tropical Cited by:   Ticks and tickborne diseases (TBDs) are serious constraints to cattle production in Tanzania and other tropical and subtropical countries.

Among the TBDs, East Coast fever (ECF) is the most important as it causes significant economic losses to the cattle industry in Tanzania. However, control of ECF in Tanzania has continued to be a challenge due to inadequate epidemiological Cited by: 5. Factors influencing the distribution of questing ticks and the prevalence stimation of T.

parva infection in brown ear ticks in the Tanga region, Tanzania. The principle objective of this study was to estimate the infection seroprevalence and identify risk factors associated with Theileria parva infection in cattle on smallholder farms in Machakos County, Kenya.

A total of farms were selected by a proportional allocation approach based on the number of farms in four divisions in the county previously selected by stratified random sampling by: 3. Introduction. Theileriosis caused by the hemoprotozoan pathogen Theileria parva still ranks first among the tick-borne diseases of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa (Minjauw and McLeod, ).Organisms in the genus Theileria are found in many wild and domesticated animals (reviewed in Norval et al., ).They are phylogenetically most closely related to members of the Babesia genus and fall in Cited by: Key parameters in T.

parva population dynamics are the relative importance of asymptomatic carrier cattle and animals undergoing severe disease, in transmission of the parasite to ticks, and the. Survival of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (Acarina: Ixodidae) and persistence of Theileria parva (Apicomplexa: Theileriidae) in the field.

Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks. Comparison of the transmission of Theileria parva between different instars of Rhipicephalus : Horace Ochanda, A. Young and Graham Medley. The protozoan parasite Theileria parva, transmitted by the ixodid tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, is the cause of East Coast fever (ECF) and the related syndromes of Corridor disease and January disease in cattle of eastern, central and southern is likely that buffalo (Syncerus caffer) are the natural host of T.

eastern and southern Africa, there exist both buffalo. Further experiments are required to address how the four factors affect the population dynamics of the six maternally transmitted S-symbionts in B.

tabaci. This study showed that co-infections with Rickettsia and Hamiltonella are more common than expected in natural populations of B biotype B. tabaci (Table 2 – 3,5). 5).Cited by: Background: Theileria parva causes East Coast fever (ECF), one of the most economically important tick-borne diseases of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa.

Theileria parva causes East Coast fever (ECF), one of the most economically important tick-borne diseases of cattle in sub-Saharan Africa. A live immunisation approach using the infection and treatment method (ITM) provides a strong long-term strain-restricted immunity. However, it typically induces a tick-transmissible carrier state in cattle and may lead to spread of antigenically distinct Author: Gaston S.

Amzati. The factors affecting successful and unsuccessful control are evaluated on a geographical and on a production systems basis, with particular reference to Theileria parva infection.

The paper then discusses four areas of the emerging disciplines of epidemiology and economics which are likely to play an important role in better control of tick Cited by: Background: The ixodid tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus is the main vector of Theileria parva, wich causes the highly fatal cattle disease East Coast fever (ECF) in sub-Saharan Africa.

Theileria parva is a parasitic protozoan that causes East Coast fever (ECF), an economically important disease of cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa.

In South Sudan, ECF is considered a major constraint for livestock development in regions where the disease is endemic. To obtain insights into the dynamics of T. parva in South Sudan, population genetic analysis was performed. Out of.

To predict the risk for transmission of tick-borne pathogens from ticks to cattle, a total of 74 Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks were collected from a location where cattle had been found positive for T.

parva. Of the ticks collected, 10 (%) were found to be PCR-positive for T. by: 7. In a population of Rhipicephalus or Hyalomma ticks feeding on cattle in which Theileria species of protozoa circulate and cause theileriosis, the ticks act as long term reservoirs of the protozoans.

In addition, some species of protozoans (within the Theileria and Babesia genera), are able to infect ticks when they exist in the blood of their hosts at such a low level that no signs of disease can be detected.Summary The spatial and temporal risk of tick‐borne disease depends fundamentally on the distribution, abundance and seasonal dynamics of the vector ticks.

The latter factor exerts a major quantitative influence on the transmission dynamics of tick‐borne parasites. The population model for Rhipicephalus appendiculatus applies throughout the range of this tick in eastern Africa, and Cited by: ().

Factors affecting the population dynamics of Theileria parva in rhipicephalid ticks. (). Factors influencing infections in Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on cattle infected with Theileria parva.

(). Fourth report on African Coast : Dirk Geysen.